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COVID-19 all-in-one update

(NEW YORK) -- Here's the latest information on the COVID-19 coronavirus as of 9:30 a.m. ET.

Latest reported numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 5,716,570
Global deaths: 356,124.  The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 100,442.
Number of countries/regions: at least 188
Total patients recovered globally: 2,367,107

Latest reported numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 1,699,933 diagnosed cases in 50 states + the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 100,442.  New York State has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 29,484.
U.S. total patients recovered: 391,508
U.S. total people tested: 15,192,481

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in New York, with 364,965 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 19.5 million.  That is the most reported cases than in any other single region in the world.  New Jersey is next, with 156,628 reported cases out of a total population of 8.88 million.

Latest reported deaths per state
Visit https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html for the latest numbers.

School closures
For a state-by-state interactive map of current school closures, please visit the Education Week website, where numbers are updated once daily.

There are 98,277 public schools and 34,576 private schools in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Those schools educate almost 50.8 million public school students and 5.8 million private school students.

The latest headlines
More than
100,000 people dead from COVID-19 in US
While the COVID-19 pandemic has sickened over 5.6 million people and killed more than 356,000 worldwide, in the U.S. death toll surpassed 100,000 on Wednesday.  According to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, it's estimated that at least 100,442 people have died from COVID-19 in the United States as of Thursday morning.  That's more than U.S. military deaths sustained in the Vietnam and Korean Wars combined.  At least 1.69 million people in the U.S. have been sickened by the virus.  America has suffered the most deaths out of any other country, with the United Kingdom reporting the second-highest death toll, 37,542, and Italy suffering the third highest-number of deaths, with 33,072.  Despite the growing U.S. death toll, states across the country continue to reopen, with Maryland resuming outdoor dining on Friday, May 29, now that the state has completed phase I of its reopening plan.  Outdoor activities like youth sports and drive in movie theaters may also resume on Friday.  Health officials continue to caution that, if social distancing measures aren't followed, a stronger second wave of the virus can hit in the fall.  In the meantime, the global search for a vaccine continues.

More than 2.1 million additional Americans file for unemployment
An additional 2,123,000 Americans filed for unemployment in the week ending May 23, according to date released this morning by the U.S. Labor Department.  That brings to more than 40 million the total number of people who have filed for unemployment in the ten weeks since the COVID-19 pandemic began, and businesses began closing and subsequently laying off employees as a result.  The 2.123 million new filings is down 323,000 from the previous week’s revised numbers, which themselves were adjusted up by 8,000, to 2.446 million.  Unemployment filings don’t necessarily signify the number of jobs lost -- the U.S. unemployment rate currently stands at 14.7%, based on data from April, but most economists expect that number may exceed 20% when the jobless numbers for May are released next week. 

Study finds five days of remdesivir treatment works well to fight COVID-19
A new international study published in the New England Journal of Medicine finds hospitalized patients who had severe COVID-19, but who didn’t require mechanical ventilation, and who were treated with the anti-viral drug remdesivir for five days fared roughly as well as patients treated with the drug for ten days.  Not only is this potentially good news for the patients being treated, but it also means physicians can potentially treat twice the number of patients with the same drug supply.  Remdesivir has so far shown promise in treating COVID-19 as the global search for a vaccine continues.  The new study was funded by pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences, which also manufactures remdesivir.

Good news!
Virginia man goes home after surviving chemo and COVID-19
Imagine already being diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy, and then learning you also have COVID-19.  Michael Alcock doesn’t have to imagine – as WJLA in Washington, D.C. reports, the husband and father of two was released from Inova Mount Vernon Hospital in Alexandria, Virginia Wednesday after 61 days of hospitalization for COVID-19, seven of which he spent on a ventilator, all while being treated for cancer.  Alcock was pushed in a wheelchair toward the exit as dozens of hospital workers lined the corridor, applauding and cheering.  An emotional Alcock said the only heroes in his story are “the nurses and the doctors who helped me fight through this.”  One of Alcock’s nurses, named Kia, also had recently recovered from COVID-19.  Michael’s advice to everyone?  If you go out, wear a mask.

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